China bans trade in wild animals for food

By : Humane Society International February 25, 2020

Humane Society International has welcomed China's announcement overnight that it will ban the buying and selling of wild animals for food. This is China's most decisive action yet to halt a trade that has been implicated in the global coronavirus crisis, and one that causes immense suffering for hundreds of thousands of animals each year, including endangered wildlife. This ban follows a temporary ban put in place last month.

"China's wildlife trade has decimated populations of certain wild animals within the country and in other nations, and this is its most monumental announcement concerning animal welfare since it banned ivory in 2017,” said Alexia Wellbelove HSI's Senior Campaign Manager. "And it couldn't have come sooner: the coronavirus outbreak, believed to have originated at a live animal market in the city of Wuhan, is spreading to other countries.”

Wildlife markets have, in the past, spawned or exacerbated other global health crises, including Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and the deadly bird flu. 

"This is a significant move by China which will not only help prevent more disease outbreaks, but also help countless endangered animals that are traded internationally and brought into China, as part of an inhumane industry and a practice that has operated with little oversight for far too long,said Ms Wellbelove.

"HSI looks forward to China's Wildlife Protection Law being revised to make the ban permanent. We also hope the ban will be extended to include the trade in wildlife for medicinal and decorative purposes. In order to prevent businesses that breed wildlife for consumption and other trade from carrying on their activities underground, China should also act to help these businesses transition to alternative livelihoods,concluded Ms Wellbelove.

Today's announcement from the National People's Congress, the Chinese national legislature, elevates the ban from an administrative action to the level of a national law. Specifically, the announcement, issued as an emergency measure, creates a comprehensive ban on the trade in terrestrial wild animals bought and sold for food, including those who are bred or reared in captivity. 

HSI will continue to closely follow the implementation and enforcement of the ban, and we will work with local animal advocates on restricting other areas of wildlife consumption not covered by the announcement. But today, let's applaud the Chinese government for taking this important step in the right direction, for its people, for the animals, and for the world.

Humane Society International has welcomed China's announcement overnight that it will ban the buying and selling of wild animals for food. This is China's most decisive action yet to halt a trade that has been implicated in the global coronavirus crisis, and one that causes immense suffering for hundreds of thousands of animals each year, including endangered wildlife. This ban follows a temporary ban put in place last month.

"China's wildlife trade has decimated populations of certain wild animals within the country and in other nations, and this is its most monumental announcement concerning animal welfare since it banned ivory in 2017,” said Alexia Wellbelove HSI's Senior Campaign Manager. "And it couldn't have come sooner: the coronavirus outbreak, believed to have originated at a live animal market in the city of Wuhan, is spreading to other countries.”

Wildlife markets have, in the past, spawned or exacerbated other global health crises, including Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and the deadly bird flu. 

"This is a significant move by China which will not only help prevent more disease outbreaks, but also help countless endangered animals that are traded internationally and brought into China, as part of an inhumane industry and a practice that has operated with little oversight for far too long,said Ms Wellbelove.

"HSI looks forward to China's Wildlife Protection Law being revised to make the ban permanent. We also hope the ban will be extended to include the trade in wildlife for medicinal and decorative purposes. In order to prevent businesses that breed wildlife for consumption and other trade from carrying on their activities underground, China should also act to help these businesses transition to alternative livelihoods,concluded Ms Wellbelove.

Today's announcement from the National People's Congress, the Chinese national legislature, elevates the ban from an administrative action to the level of a national law. Specifically, the announcement, issued as an emergency measure, creates a comprehensive ban on the trade in terrestrial wild animals bought and sold for food, including those who are bred or reared in captivity. 

HSI will continue to closely follow the implementation and enforcement of the ban, and we will work with local animal advocates on restricting other areas of wildlife consumption not covered by the announcement. But today, let's applaud the Chinese government for taking this important step in the right direction, for its people, for the animals, and for the world.

 

Photo by Blickwinkel/Alamy Stock Photo

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About HSI Australia

HSI concentrates on the preservation of endangered animals and ecosystems and works to ensure quality of life for all animals, both domestic and wild. HSI is the largest animal protection not-for-profit organisation in the world and has been established in Australia since 1994