Vital yet villainised.

Flying-foxes are remarkable and vital animals — they travel vast distances and disperse seeds as they go. But they are targeted and killed when they are considered a threat to fruit trees or if their camps disturb local residents as they migrate through towns.

Flying-fox stuck in a fruit net
Fruit netting is a major risk to flying-foxes. They get stuck in the large holes where they often die a slow and unnecessary death. Photo by Mike Jupp / WIRES

HSI has proudly secured legal protections for eight species of flying-foxes and bats but some species are still persecuted despite their threatened status—especially grey-headed and spectacled flying-foxes.

Shooting flying-foxes is ineffective and has massive animal welfare issues. Many animals are wounded and die slowly, sometimes when carrying young. Safe netting is a simple and effective alternative to shooting. 

We have secured a phase out of crop-protection shooting licenses in New South Wales, leaving Queensland as the only state that will still permit the cruel and unnecessary shooting of flying-foxes. Please take action to help stop flying-fox shooting in Queensland.

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At long last, a pathway to recovery for the grey-headed flying-fox

At long last, a pathway to recovery for the grey-headed flying-fox

The grey-headed flying-fox, one of the largest bats in the world, was listed as a nationally Vulnerable species in 2001 after being nominated for the threatened status by Humane Society International. They cover a…

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Disastrous decline: Spectacled flying-fox nominated as Critically Endangered

Disastrous decline: Spectacled flying-fox nominated as Critically Endangered

In response to disastrous declines Humane Society International (HSI) has nominated the spectacled flying-fox, a species that provides vital ecosystem services such as pollination and seed dispersal across Queensland’s Wet Tropics, to have its…

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How does a threatened species get protected?

How does a threatened species get protected?

Humane Society International is responsible for the scientific nominations behind some 73 species and 37 ecological communities that are listed as nationally threatened in Australia. These listings are the result of more than two decades of persistent research efforts…

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