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Convention for Conservation of Migratory Species (CMS)      

Marine Conservation

CONVENTION ON CONSERVATION OF MIGRATORY SPECIES

The objective of the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals or the CMS Convention, is to conserve terrestrial, avian and marine species over the whole of their migratory range. It arose from a recognition of the need for countries to cooperate in conserving animals which migrate across national boundaries or between national territorial waters and the high seas.

HSI POLICY ON THE CMS CONVENTION


HSI lobbies the Australian and other relevant governments to use the CMS to its fullest potential. We often suggest species nominations and the development of agreements to benefit migratory wildlife and prevent further endangerment. It is fair to say HSI has been the pressure behind Australian government initiatives to list threatened albatross species and pursue regional agreements for albatross conservation. Having seen our suggestions taken up in these areas HSI will also urge the government to seek greater regional cooperation in protecting our endangered turtle species, cetaceans, sharks and the dugong.

Where resources permit HSI will endeavour to join the Australian government as a member of their delegation to the Convention, lend our expertise in wildlife protection and ensure the delegation maintains a strong conservation position. HSI has taken part in negotiations for regional cooperation for the albatrosses and petrels, sharks and for marine turtles, as an adviser on the Australian Government delegation.

AUSTRALIA'S POSITION ON THE CMS


The Australian government has historically been a positive and active participant at the Convention. At the 1997 meeting in Geneva, Australia successfully nominated albatross species to the CMS appendices and spearheaded a regional agreement for these species – the Agreement for the Conservation of Albatross and Petrels. Australia has also been a leader in achieving regional cooperation for whales, turtles, sharks and the dugong. Recently, however, Australia has not delivered well on domestic protection for migratory sharks, buckling to pressure from reactional fishers.

TREATY EFFECT


The CMS has two appendices. To qualify for an Appendix I listing a migratory species must be at risk of extinction throughout all or a portion of their range. Strict conservation, obligations are imposed on parties to the convention which are a range state for Appendix 1 species.

Migratory species are eligible for Appendix II if they have an unfavourable conservation status and will depend on international agreements for their successful conservation, or if they have a conservation status that would significantly benefit from international cooperation. This means a species does not have to be endangered to warrant listing on Appendix II. There are no direct obligations imposed on the parties for Appendix II species but they are required to develop further 'agreements' for their protection according to guidelines established by the Treaty.

LATEST NEWS

 

INFLUENCE OF RECREATIONAL FISHERS IN INTERNATIONAL SHARK PROTECTION EXEMPTION REVEALED BY FOI DOCUMENTS

30 April 2015 click here  

AUSTRALIA DENIES DOMESTIC PROTECTION FOR GLOBALLY THREATENED MIGRATORY SHARKS - IN FAVOUR OF COMMERCIAL AND SPORT FISHERMEN

20th January 2015 click here 

unprecedented new conservation measures agreed for key marine species

10 November 2014 click here 

CMS SIGNS PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT WITH HUMANE SOCIETY INTERNATIONAL AUSTRALIA

December 21 2011 click here

HISTORIC PROGRESS MADE ON MIGRATORY SPECIES - OPINION PIECEpn cms cop10, bergen norway, november 2011

December 2011 click here

convention on migratory species, 10th Conference of Parties - HSI Statement

20-25 November 2011 download PDF (105kB)

convention on migratory species - saving sharks

1-8th December 2008 click here 

convention on migratory species - sharks

11-13th December 2007 click here 

 

 





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